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Diversity and Inclusion

A work-in-progress resource for faculty, students, and administrators on creating more inclusive and diverse classrooms.

Weight stigma among providers decreases the quality of care received by obese patients.

Jones, K. (2010). Weight stigma among providers decreases the quality of care received by obese patients. Retrieved from http://commons.pacificu.edu/pa/207/    

Abstract: Prior research has provided evidence supporting the hypothesis that weight stigma exists among health care providers and affects the quality of care delivered to obese patients. Evidence has also shown that obese patients delay health care, contributing to the decrease in their quality of health care compared to non-obese patients. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive analysis of current research uncovering weight stigma in the health care field.

A Study of Discrimination within the Medical Community as Viewed by Obese Patients

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Kaminsky, J., & Gadaleta, D. (2002). A Study of Discrimination within the Medical Community as Viewed by Obese Patients. Obesity Surgery, 12(1), 14–18. http://doi.org/10.1381/096089202321144513

Abstract: Although prejudice may not be verbal in nature, the lack of response from professional and non-professional medical personnel regarding the obese patients' needs (medical equipment, comfortable surroundings, properly fitting attire, etc.), leads one to assume that obese patients continue to be a target of unfavorable opinion.

Are medical students aware of their anti-obesity bias?

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Miller, D. P., Spangler, J. G., Vitolins, M. Z., Davis, S. W., Ip, E. H., Marion, G. S., & Crandall, S. J. (2013). Are Medical Students Aware of Their Anti-obesity Bias?: Academic Medicine, 88(7), 978–982. http://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e318294f817

Abstract: Between 2008 and 2011, the authors asked all third-year medical students at Wake Forest School of Medicine to complete the Weight Implicit Association Test (IAT), a validated measure of implicit preferences for “fat” or “thin” individuals. Students also answered a semantic differential item assessing their explicit weight-related preferences. The authors determined students’ awareness of their biases by examining the correlation between students’ explicit preferences and their IAT scores.