Skip to Main Content

Diversity and Inclusion

A work-in-progress resource for faculty, students, and administrators on creating more inclusive and diverse classrooms.

Bosnian Immigrants' Perceptions of the United States Health Care System: A Qualitative Interview Study

Full Text for Upstate Users

Searight, H. (2003). Bosnian Immigrants' Perceptions of the United States Health Care System: A Qualitative Interview Study. Journal Of Immigrant Health, 5(2). http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1022907909721

Abstract: During the 1990s, approximately 300,000 Bosnian immigrants came to the United States as a result of the Balkan wars. In contrast to immigrants from less developed countries, Bosnian refugees were typically older, had experienced significant war related trauma, and were accustomed to universal health insurance coverage. There is little information about Bosnian immigrants' transition to the U.S. health care system. As part of a related project, 12 Bosnian immigrants were interviewed about their perceptions of the U.S. health care system and their experiences as patients. Participants were universally critical of the U.S. system and described several core issues: confusion about insurance coverage, personalized quality of care, access to primary and specialty care; and a perception of U.S. health care as bureaucratic. Participants compared their experience with prewar Bosnian health care along these dimensions. Implications of the findings and suggestions for improving care to the Bosnian immigrant population are provided.